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The Adjutant

Engraved by R. Brandard, Drawn by William Daniell R. A.

London: Edward Churton, 1836. Steel Engraving, Size: 195x125 mm.

 

From the book title The Oriental Annual or Scenes in India, 1836, By William Daniell.

 

The Greater Adjutant, is a huge bird standing tall at 145–150 cm (57–60 in). The average length is 136 cm (54 in) and average wingspan is 250 cm (99 in), a member of the stork family, Ciconiidae. Its genus includes the Lesser Adjutant of Asia and the Marabou Stork of Africa. Once found widely across southern Asia, mainly in India but extending east to Borneo, the Greater Adjutant is now restricted to a much smaller range with only two small breeding populations; in India with the largest colony in Assam and the other in Cambodia. Populations disperse after the breeding season. This large stork has a massive wedge-shaped bill, a bare head and a distinctive neck pouch. During the day, they soar in thermals along with vultures with whom they share the habit of scavenging. They feed mainly on carrion and offal; however, they are opportunistic and will sometimes prey on vertebrates. The English name is derived from their stiff "military" gait when walking on the ground. Large numbers once lived in Asia, but have declined greatly, possibly due to improved sanitation, to the point of being endangered. The total population in 2008 was estimated at around a thousand individuals. In the 19th century, they were especially common in the city of Calcutta, where they were referred to as the "Calcutta Adjutant". Known locally as Hargila (derived from the Sanskrit word for "bone-swallower") and considered to be unclean birds, they were largely left undisturbed but sometimes hunted for the use of their meat in folk medicine.

 
 
 
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The Monkey and Cranes

Engraved by R. Brandard, Drawn by William Daniell R. A.

London: Edward Churton, 1836. Steel Engraving, Size: 195x125 mm.

 

From the book title The Oriental Annual or Scenes in India, 1836, By William Daniell.

 
 
 
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The Braminee Bull

Engraved by R. Woodman, Drawn by William Daniell R. A.

London: Edward Churton, 1836. Steel Engraving, Size: 195x125 mm.

 

From the book title The Oriental Annual or Scenes in India, 1836, By William Daniell

The Brahminee bulls are generally about the size of calves of two years old, except in some districts, as in Guzerat, where they are sometimes found as large as the Durham ox. Upon their haunches there is an emblem of the god Siva, to whom they are devoted, and held in such high reverence, that no one is permitted to strike them, or to prevent them from feeding pre-v cisely where and upon what they please. They are almost always to be seen in the bazaars, where they unceremoniously enter the shops, begin to munch the grain exposed for sale, and frequently turn over everything in their way., to the great annoyance of the sedate Hindoo, who nevertheless bears it all with a religious patience, allowing the sacred intruder to continue its freaks so long as it may fancy agreeable.
One of the bulls represented in the engraving chose to take a dislike to a small, rough-haired, terrier dog, of the Scotch breed, which I had with me, and, unexpectedly raising him on its horns, nearly flung him into the river. Snap, not at all pleased at such uncourteous treatment, no sooner recovered his legs, than he rushed upon the bull, seized it by the lip, to which he clung with such persevering obstinacy, that though the animal, with a stifled roar, galloped off at its utmost speed, the terrier still maintained his hold for at least five minutes; and when at length he did relinquish the bull's lip, the enemy did not show the least disposition to renew the encounter, but sought the shelter of a pagoda, whither its companion actively followed.

 
 
 
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Lion and Buffaloe

Engraved by R. Brandard, Drawn by William Daniell R. A.

London: Edward Churton, 1836. Steel Engraving, Size: 195x125 mm.

 

From the book title The Oriental Annual or Scenes in India, 1836, By William Daniell

 
 
 
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The Yak of Thibet

Engraved by R. Wallis, Drawn by William Daniell R. A.

London: Bull and Churton, 1835. Steel Engraving, Size: 195x125 mm.

 

From the book title The Oriental Annual or Scenes in India, 1835, By William Daniell.

 

 

 
 
 
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